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Creating Art with a Newborn

What most people said:

I was trolling the interwebs when I found this article today. It really hit home. Over the course of my pregnancy I was frequently told by friends, some family members, and other artists that I wouldn’t be able to do art anymore when my turtle baby was born. I’m fairly (okay, extremely) stubborn and don’t react well when I’m told that I can’t do something that I’m 100% capable of doing. Want to give me advice? Great! I’d love to hear it. However, if you want to tell me that I will be limited in a specific way then I’ll just work ten times harder to overcome said limitation.

On Creating Art with a Newborn

My turtle baby is 7 weeks old and I’m pleased to say that I’m still creating art. I don’t have as much time or energy as I previously did but I have found that, with some creative shuffling, I still get work done. Sketching, looking up reference images, writing e-mails/blog posts/social media updates all occurs while the turtle eats. When she sleeps I’m able to work on larger projects. I sacrifice longer showers, naps, and personal time to be able to work but it is worth it.
 

Behind the stubborn shell

To be honest, like the article mentions, motherhood has improved not only my life but also my art. If anything, motherhood is a huge exercise in learning. I’ve learned is to use my time more wisely and have learned to more fully embrace and absorb each moment that I’m in while I’m in it. Patience for myself, my turtle baby, and others is growing. I’m learning to utilize more tact in my daily interactions while maintaining honesty. I’m learning to appreciate life and enjoy each moment to its fullest. Because of my turtle baby I’m happier, better balanced in my priorities, more full of love, and over all a better human being. Frankly, I’d never trade this experience for anything.
Lauren-crest-illustration-baby-motherhood-mom-artist-portrait
 

Getting Feedback on Your Art

As you may have seen a few weeks ago on my Instagram feed, my husband spotted an error in one of my pieces. Thankfully he caught it in time and I was able to fix it before it became a more difficult problem. This is one of the reasons that I LOVE frequent peer reviews and critiques. It is always helpful to have a second set of eyes to look at a piece and tell you what is off. Usually I find that I’ve been looking at something for too long and can feel that something isn’t right but can’t really place a finger on what it is. This is where critiques come into play.

For critiques I’ve found a few helpful sources.

  • One is my grandma. Back in the day she worked as nurse in a hospital. She has always loved all things medical so while she hasn’t worked as a nurse for a long time it is still at the forefront of her mind. I know that if something isn’t right proportionally or anatomically she will spot it pretty quickly. She is who I turn to with most of my character studies or complex illustrations where the person doesn’t feel quite right. Since my grandma is not practical to be used as a resource I’d recommend finding and befriending someone who is trained and familiar with the human anatomy. This can really be a HUGE asset to both beginners and experienced artists when working with the figure.
  • Another resource that I’ve found helpful is local art groups. I’m terrible at keeping up with them and getting out of my house but when I do it has always been a fantastic experience. To find your own group check out Facebook art groups or even your local galleries to see what events are going on around you. Most cities are teaming with groups of artists who are in your area who like to meet up, discuss art, and hang out. By engaging with local artists you will make connections, learn new skills, as well as be able to get necessary feedback on your work when the time comes. These groups are especially helpful when it comes to critiques on composition, lighting, and color use.
  • Ask a friend. If you can’t meet up with an artist friend/group and can’t seem to figure out what is wrong with your piece, ask a friend. Even someone who isn’t trained in art can usually point out pretty big  errors in your work. My husband has notoriously shocked me with what he has pointed out in my pieces (like the time I drew the wrong food on a leg. That was an embarrassing day) when I get too caught up in my work.
  • When all else fails, ask an online community. I personally feel it is best to get critiques in person since communication is a lot more clear and direct and the artwork is always slightly different when scanned in vs seen in person. However, when all else fails or when you have a SUPER short deadline this is a surefire way to find help. I’ve used the forums on DeviantArt, Facebook illustration groups, and the Forums at SVS Learn to get feedback on my work. Depending on the level of the group you may get some really in depth feedback on your piece and how to improve it.

Where do you go for critiques? Were any of these ideas useful to you? Let me know on my Facebook page!

Artists to Follow?

If you’ve read most of my blog posts you’ll notice a common trend. Quite often I like to reference either Will Terry Illustration and The Oatley Academy of Visual Storytelling as two sources that I follow that have been extremely helpful to my art. I’ve posted about and linked to their YouTube videos/podcasts and have specified how my work has gotten better because of them. As a freelance illustrator these sources have been invaluable. They have given me a better sense of direction, have helped me to improve my style of art, and have greatly changed how I approach art as a business.

In the recent past I’ve also referenced Wylie Beckert Illustration‘s tutorials as being super helpful to me. Her tutorials have allowed me to refresh on some painting basics and have assisted in pointing out where flaws in my own paintings are.

So today I’m asking you, who do you follow? What artists/youtube channels/podcasts/companies/blogs/etc do you follow that have helped you grow as an artist? I look forward to your responses in the comments. 😀

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